Tuesday, March 14, 2017

An Infographic of Softball

Image result for infographic of softballAccording to this infographic, softball was created on Thanksgiving Day in 1887. It originated at an indoor game which has now evolved into an outdoor game. It gained the name “Softball” in 1926, in 1933 the “ASA”, Amateur Softball Association of America, governs the sport throughout America.

This infographic gives examples when comparing softball and baseball. It explains the different ways and rules on how to pitch the ball. In baseball, you have to throw overhand, in softball you have to throw underhand. It also gives a brief history of softball. It gives you the names the sport has bared over the years. It started out as “Indoor Baseball”, which if you ask any softball player, we’re pretty passionate about how softball is NOT the same as baseball. The second name honored to the sport was “Pumpkin Ball”. I’m not really positive how that name came to be given that neither a baseball or a softball look like pumpkins; pretty far from it actually.

Part of this timeline is stationed in 1889 when a “Winter League” was formed in Chicago. Fireman, Lewis Rober*, decided he needed a game for his fellow firemen while they were waiting on fire calls. This is a perfect example of the sport, although Lewis was male, it is still called softball instead of baseball. They played by softball rules, not baseball rules. The rules definitely play a big part in separating the two sports. As explained earlier, the rules for pitching are different, but so are the base running rules, the batting it a little different but not by much.

As for the rules of softball .v. baseball, they are similar which is what many people argue when saying they are the same sport, but they are still different. In softball, when you are on the base and waiting for the pitcher to pitch, you are not allowed to leave the base until the ball leaves the pitcher’s hand. In baseball, you are allowed to be off the base before the pitcher is even ready to begin pitching, that definitely helps give an advance in stealing bases or advancing, whereas in softball, it is harder because to steal a base you have to be quick and aware so you don’t get picked off by the catcher.


The actual field is very different as well. The typical baseball, in the MLB for example, has ninety(90) feet between bases, whereas in softball the typical distance is sixty(60) feet. The mound on the baseball field is raised, giving the pitcher momentum when he finishes his pitch, a softball field is flat, we provide ourselves with enough momentum as we wind up that we don’t need a downhill slope to help us project the pitch.

When it comes to batting, there isn’t that much of a difference. In softball you can only have ASA certified bats, which do not include wooden bats. In baseball, the MLB, you almost always see wooden bats. Very rarely do you see an aluminum or a compact bat. Wooden bats work really well when you have small objects at a high velocity, 70-90 mph is generally how fast a baseball pitch is thrown, in softball, we have wider headed bats for a bigger ball. We have less reaction time in softball, only 45-53 feet from home plate, the softball mound is screwed into the ground, although the ball is a lot slower, only 60-80 mph.
As explained in an infographic, and in my blog post, softball and baseball are two different sports, and softball has had a long history, ranging all the way back 1889. This infographic gives examples when comparing softball and baseball. It explains the different ways and rules on how to pitch the ball. In baseball, you have to throw overhand, in softball you have to throw underhand. It also gives a brief history of softball. It gives you the names the sport has bared over the years. It started out as “Indoor Baseball”, which if you ask any softball player, we’re pretty passionate about how softball is NOT the same as baseball. The second name honored to the sport was “Pumpkin Ball”. I’m not really positive how that name came to be given that neither a baseball or a softball look like pumpkins; pretty far from it actually.


Part of this timeline is stationed in 1889 when a “Winter League” was formed in Chicago. Fireman, Lewis Rober*, decided he needed a game for his fellow firemen while they were waiting on fire calls. This is a perfect example of the sport, although Lewis was male, it is still called softball instead of baseball. They played by softball rules, not baseball rules. The rules definitely play a big part in separating the two sports. As explained earlier, the rules for pitching are different, but so are the base running rules, the batting it a little different but not by much.


As for the rules of softball .v. baseball, they are similar which is what many people argue when saying they are the same sport, but they are still different. In softball, when you are on the base and waiting for the pitcher to pitch, you are not allowed to leave the base until the ball leaves the pitcher’s hand. In baseball, you are allowed to be off the base before the pitcher is even ready to begin pitching, that definitely helps give an advance in stealing bases or advancing, whereas in softball, it is harder because to steal a base you have to be quick and aware so you don’t get picked off by the catcher.


The actual field is very different as well. The typical baseball, in the MLB for example, has ninety(90) feet between bases, whereas in softball the typical distance is sixty(60) feet. The mound on the baseball field is raised, giving the pitcher momentum when he finishes his pitch, a softball field is flat, we provide ourselves with enough momentum as we wind up that we don’t need a downhill slope to help us project the pitch.


When it comes to batting, there isn’t that much of a difference. In softball you can only have ASA certified bats, which do not include wooden bats. In baseball, the MLB, you almost always see wooden bats. Very rarely do you see an aluminum or a compact bat. Wooden bats work really well when you have small objects at a high velocity, 70-90 mph is generally how fast a baseball pitch is thrown, in softball, we have wider headed bats for a bigger ball. We have less reaction time in softball, only 45-53 feet from home plate, the softball mound is screwed into the ground, although the ball is a lot slower, only 60-80 mph.

As explained in an infographic, and in my blog post, softball and baseball are two different sports, and softball has had a long history,

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